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AAStikta sharma

Software Engineer, Microsoft

 

You will be amazed to see how small efforts today will reap you great results in the future.

What do you do?

I am a full-stack developer who builds platforms to drive and increase Marketplace’s consumption of vast catalog of products and end-to-end solutions from independent software vendors to drive consumption of Azure. 

Why did you choose this field?

"To be able to navigate to an entire new world of information." 

Computers fascinated me since the day we got one at our home around 2007. The first introductions to be able to navigate to an entire new world of information via a box at home was one of the stepping stones to where I am right now. I ended up taking coding during my time in high school and from then on there was no turning back. 

What do you look at and think, "I wish younger me would have known this was possible"?

It was back in 2007 when I had heard the name Microsoft (thanks to Windows Vista!) and year by year, it became a dream to be a part of such amazing organization. When I got this job, the first thing that came to my mind was I didn't knew it was possible. If there was one thing, I would tell my younger self, it would be this.

Why do you love working in STEM?

Every day at Microsoft is an opportunity to learn something new and this wouldn't have been possible without STEM. STEM has opened doors to a whole new set of challenges that I would have never explored. I could have never imagined how my work could help drive consumption of one of the most widely used cloud services.

Best advice for the next generation

Albert Einstein once said: "Imagination is more important than knowledge" and if you can imagine to pursue your goals in STEM then everything else is secondary. Dream big, aim higher and march forward. You will be amazed to see how small efforts today will reap you great results in the future.

Fun fact

I love reading books. I have a wide variety of interests ranging from non-fiction (like Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers) to fiction (Robert Galbraith's novels).